Jelling kirke, Gorms grav

Jelling kirke, Gorms grav
Jelling kirke, Gorms grav

Sunday, October 19, 2008

Ingeborg Esbernsdatter , 1203-1267, ~ Peder Strangesen, 1170-1241

 
Kalundborg Cathedral

Ingeborg was a daughter of Esbern Snare and his third wife Helene. She was married to the respected drost and magnate Peder Strangesen. He was probably a son of Knud Valdemarsen's staller, Strange, and is already noticed in 1193 as being one of the king's noblest men. He seems to have learned courtly manners by the counts of Orlamünde and Gleichen. He had a sister Gro Strangesdatter, who was married to Knud. Their son Anders Grosen was married to Cæcilie Esbernsdatter.

During Valdemar 2. Sejr's ruling period his power grew even more, and next to Jacob Sunesen he was the most respected nobleman in Denmark. His marriage to a daughter of Esbern Snare contributed to this, as much as he inherited Esbern Snare's famous estate, Kalundborg, which Esbern had fortificated for Valdemar ab. 1170.

He was the 'Peder of Kalundborg' whom Valdemar 2. gave property on Femern, named Pedersdorf after him. Together with other magnates he worked in 1225 in order to have king Valdemar released from prison, and he guaranteed the agreement. Likewise he guaranteed the final agreement in 1230, where the young Valdemar-sons were released.


At Sorø Kloster

Peder Strangesen had a long dispute with Sorø Kloster. Esbern Snare's son Johannes, who was Valdemar II's Marsk, had on his deathbed in 1231 given Sorø the village Stenløsemagle with additions, but his brother Absalon Bælg kept the estate until shortly before his death in 1232. Peder Strangesen and his nephew Anders Grosen, who was married to another daughter of Esbern Snare, Cæcilia of Tersløse, would not acknowledge Sorø Kloster's right and appropriated the disputed estate in 1231. Although the church's judgment was against them they kept the property for life.

Nevertheless Peder Strangesen seemed to be of a religious disposition, at least in his final years.When Valdemar died in 1241, Peder went on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, but just when he started his journey, he died in Ribe in 1241, ab. 71 years of age.

In his coat of arms were an eagle and a wolf, the same coat of arms later used by the Ulfeldt-family.


Kalundborg Castle ruins

His widow Ingeborg, named Fru Ingeborg of Kalundborg, was on Kalundborg castle for 20 years after his death as the mighty Frue (lady of the castle) and showed to be a benefactor of Sorø. With consent from her kinsmen, among those her half brother, duke Knud, she conveyed all her estate in Bringstrup and Ørslev in 1250 to Sorø. Likewise she gave gifts to Århus Cathedral in the honour of The Holy Niels.

In 1247 most of Sorø Kloster (the Kloster built by Absalon) burnt down, and about 10 years later fru Ingeborg gave a big gift to the Kloster, which made the monks able to have stone vaults built in the church and thereby prevent further fires. The first village church Esbern Snare let build was Ubby in 1170 and already shortly after 1200 it was rebuilt - maybe by his daughter, fru Ingeborg.

During the tension between the Danish crown and duke Erik Abelsen, Ingeborg's son Anders, who first was Abel's marsk, positioned himself on the duke's side. He was seen in the duke's entourage after his victory in Lohede in 1261. The Hvide-family had a strong connection to the Abel-line and a big part of the family gave its support, but the Abel- line lost the battle of the Danish crown to Kristoffer I. This must have been considered a treason against the crown,and Ingeborg was driven away from Kalundborg by Erik Glipping the next year (1262) and died in Hedeby, Schleswig in 1267.

Ingeborg's sister Cæcilie was mother-in- law to Lave Gudmundsen, who was convicted for the murder of Erik Plovpenning in 1252. After a period of 100 year's alliance between the Hvide-family and the royal power the whole thing had begun eroding.



The Baptismal Font in Kalundborg Cathedral created by the Hvide-Family's stone mason. The similar decorations are also found in stone work in Fjenneslev Church. The font was in the church from the beginning, and it's very likely that Ingeborg and Peder's children were baptized here.

Ingeborg and Peder's children:

1)Helena Pedersdatter,* ab. 1215 was previously married to Knut Långe, Swedish king, who was killed in 1234. Their children were: Holmber Knutsson, Earl in Sweden, killed in 1248. Filip Knutsson,killed near Herrevad's Bridge 1251 (FK uncertain).Helena's second marriage was to Earl Filip Larsson .

2) Elisabeth Pedersdatter, * ab. 1230, married to Niels Hvide Erlandsen * ab. 1220 + 1286 in Lund (slægten Galen) Niels' mother was Cecilie Herlufsdatter Galen. (see later in the Seven Sune Sons the story about Cecilie's mother Margrethe Sunesdatter, who was murdered by her husband Herlog (Herluf)

3) Marianne Pedersdatter Strangesen, * ab. 1235 in Kalundborg, + 1283 , buried in Viborg, married to Albrecht von Eberstein, + 1289 to Ørnehoved by Randers. (see Genealogy, Forfædrelinie V, 15.) Their children: a) Ludvig Eberstein , + 29 May 1328, buried in Viborg, married to Else Pedersdatter, b) Albert (Anders?) Eberstein, * ab. 1276 , + ab 1330, buried in Viborg, married to Marianne Ulfeldt (Strangesen) c) Henrik Eberstein married to Margrethe.

4) Johannes Pedersen
5) Anders Pedersen, king Abel's Marsk
6) Margrethe Pedersdatter
7) Ingeborg Pedersdatter

photo: grethe bachmann

source: Dansk/Norsk/Svensk Biografisk Lexicon; Danmarks Historie, Politiken 3-4; Vikingeskibsmuseet; Nationalmuseet; Skalk, arkæologisk magasin; Saxo Grammaticus; Emma emmorium; Sejer Olesen Leth og hans slægt af P. Filtenborg; Den Hvide Klan af Michael Kræmmer; Thi de var af stor slægt af Marianne Johannesen & Helle Halding.



From Dansk Biografisk Lexicon,
Carl Frederik Bricka,
Project Runeberg

Ingeborg, - 1267 , a daughter of Esbern Snare and his third wife, Helene; she was married to the respected Stormand (magnate) Peder Strangesen (d. 1241). While he had protested to Sorø Kloster about its ownership of the estate, which Ingeborg's brother Johannes Marsk had given to it, fru Ingeborg showed to be the benefactor of the kloster after her husband's death. With the consent of her family, among those her half brother hertug Knud (the son of Helene and king Valdemar II), she conveyed all her estate in Bringstrup and Ørslev to Sorø kloster. (1250). Likewise she was said to give gifts to Århus cathedral in the honour of Hellig Niels.

Ingeborg is mainly named after her father's borg, Kalundborg, fru Inge of Kalundborg, where she lived as the mighty lady. But during the tension between the Danish Crown and Hertug Erik Abelsen, Ingeborg's son Anders, who was once Abels Marsk, was on the side of hertug Abel, since he is seen in his entourage after his victory at Lohede (1261), and Ingeborg herself was friendly to Abel's family; anyhow she was expelled from Kalundborg the next year and died in Schleswig in 1267.

Peder Strangesen, ab. 1170-1241, Stormand (magnate, probably a son of Knud Valdemarsens Staller (King's official) Strange; he is seen already in 1193 as one of king Knud's (Knud VI) most distinguished men, and he seems during the next years to have learned courtly customs by the Grafs of Orlamünde and Gleichen. During Valdemar II (Sejr) his power increased even more, and next to Jacob Sunesen he was the most respected nobleman in Denmark. His marriage contributed to this, since he married Esbern Snare's daughter Ingeborg, and he inherited via his wife Esbern's famous estate, the strong Kalundborg. He must be the "Peder af Kalundborg", whom Valdemar II gave 12 Bol (farms/houses) or Hove at Femern, which were named Petersdorff after him. Together with other Danish magnates he worked in 1225 for king Valdmar to be released from confinement and fought for the agreement though not personally present; likewise he fought for the final agreement with the Schwerings (1230), where the young princes (Valdemar's sons) were released, and this time he co-sealed the agreement.

Peder Strangesen had a long feud with Sorø kloster. Esbern Snare's son, Johannes, Valdemar II's Marsk, had on his deathbed given Stenløsemagle with additions to the kloster (1213), but his brother Absalon Bælg kept the estate until shortly before his own death (1232). Peder Strangesen and Anders Grosen, who was married to another of Esbern Snare's daughters, Cæcilie of Tersløse, would not accept the rights of the kloster ad simply took the disputed estate (1234), and even though the judgment of the church was against them, they kept it for life. None the less Peder S. seems to have had an ecclesiastical disposition. When king Valdemar had died, Peder chose to go on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, but just after he had started his journey, he died in Ribe (1241). Among his numerous children were Anders, who became Abel's Marsk, and Ingeborg, married to Graf Ernst of Gleichen. In his coat of arms Peder Strangesen had a mix of an eagle and a wolf, the same coat of arms which later was the Ulfeldts.

Translated from Hans Olrik's Danish text: grethe bachmann ©copyright
Dansk Biografisk Lexicon
Carl Fr. Bricka
Project Runeberg

No comments: