Jelling kirke, Gorms grav

Jelling kirke, Gorms grav
Jelling kirke, Gorms grav

Wednesday, April 8, 2009


Skjalmsen, Ebbe, o. 1090-1151, sjællandsk Høvding (Zealand chief), son of Skjalm Hvide, is first seen in history when he together with his brothers had Knud Lavard's body moved from
Haraldsted to Ringsted, and when he rose the men at Zealand into a revenge of his fosterbrother's kill (in 1131). In the following civil war he was on Erik Emune's side, and he was also one of Erik Lam's most trusted men, furthermore was he a faithful adherent of Svend Grade/Grathe, who made him høvedsmand (main chief) in the newly fortificated Roskilde.
Svend's rival Knud Magnussen tried via a certain man named Sune to lure the citizens of Roskilde away from Svend, but Ebbe Skjalmsen cunningly got Sune in his power, and the plan was prevented. (in 1148). Later Knud succeeded in taking Roskilde by surprise; Ebbe S. escaped, but he couldn't prevent Knud from harrassing in Roskilde and burning his farm. According to Saxo Ebbe S. had such a big influence on Svend Grathe, that Svend in war as well as in peace, in public as in private relations always followed Ebbe's advice, and the news of his death (in 1151) overwhelmed the young king, and he abandoned his expedition against Knud; Svend's fater had probably been luckier, if he still had had the experienced adviser at his side.
Ebbe Skjalmsen founded Sorø Kloster together with his brethren Toke Skjalmsen and Asser Rig .
Ebbe was first married to Gyda, then to Ragnhild, together with whom he built a wooden
church at their farm in Bjernede. Their son Sune Ebbesen built later instead of the wooden church a beautiful round stone church, but made an inscription in memory of his parents' pious deed. Ragnhild survived Ebbe S. by more than 10 years and gave Sacerbro Mølle to Sorø Kloster; she was buried by Ebbe's side in Sorø Klosterkirke. Shortly after Ragnhild's death Ebbe's eldest son, Toke Ebbesen, died after having given half of his hovedstol (inheritance) to Sorø Kloster. Another Ebbe-son, Fin, died at the same time. A third son, Peder Ebbesen lived somewhat longer. The most famous Ebbe-son was Sune Ebbesen, the father of "the Seven Sune Sons".
translated from Hans Olrik's Danish text by Grethe Bachmann.

Saxo, Hist. Dan.
Løffler, Danmarks ældre Kirkebygninger.

Dansk Biografisk Lexicon
(1887-1905) Carl Frederik Bricka
Project Runeberg


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